Opinion: Inaugural poet Amanda Gorman proves that young Black women can accomplish anything

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Lacey Buckley

Amanda Gorman’s presentation of “The Hill We Climb” was assertive, and her facial gestures, body language and pauses helped make the words of her inaugural poem come to life. In Makiya Lowman’s opinion, “She clearly knew her audience and how to make them listen to her the way she wanted to be listened to.”

Makiya Lowman, Staff Writer

Inaugural poet Amanda Gorman wrote a beautifully worded poem called “The Hill We Climb” and presented it to the world for the first time Jan. 20 for new President Joe Biden.

When I heard Gorman recite this poem, it was like my eyes were being opened to what talented young people we have in this new generation, my generation. In the poem, Gorman wrote about how we’ve come so far, been through so much, and how there’s still a lot we can do to improve and grow, not only as individuals but also as a nation. She spoke in a way that people of all ages, young and old, could have an understanding of her message.

Gorman didn’t necessarily say anything about the attacks against the U.S. Capitol two weeks ago, but there was no doubt the Jan. 6 violence was on her mind when she wrote “The Hill We Climb.” I believe this because she wrote, “We close the divide because we know to put our future first, we must put our differences aside.” She wants to unite America’s citizens, white and Black, poor and rich, so we can fight for a better, tranquil future.

The poem is passionate. A line that also drew my attention was, “We will not march back to what was, but move to what shall be.” I liked that, because it spoke to me about what our country should be.

Gorman’s presentation was also assertive, and her facial gestures, body language and pauses helped make her words come to life. Just 22 years old, she clearly knew her audience and how to make them listen to her the way she wanted to be listened to. 

In interviews, the National Youth Poet Laureate has said that one day she would like to be the president of the United States. It’s amazing how Gorman can see herself in that role, and I hope that one day I can see her in that position too. Maybe even be there with her.

There’s no better feeling than seeing Black women being represented in a bright light. Black women can accomplish anything we put our minds to, and Amanda Gorman has proved that.